Sertraline

what is it?

Sertraline is an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) commonly used as an antidepressant, although it is prescribed ‘off-label’ to treat a range of medical issues including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Premature Ejaculation (PE). In the context of this FAQ, Sertraline is being prescribed as PE medication.

what's in it?

Active Ingredients:

Sertraline hydrochloride

Inactive Ingredients:

Microcrystalline cellulose, sodium starch glycolate, hydroxypropyl cellulose, dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, titanium dioxide, polyethylene glycol, and polysorbate 80; 50mg contains FD&C blue #2 aluminum lake.

i placed an order, how does this work?

Since this treatment is a prescription medication, after you place your requested order you will be prompted to complete a medical assessment and complete an online visit with a doctor. The doctor will determine if a prescription for Sertraline is appropriate. You can find more info about the independent doctors accessible through our platform and care delivery here.

who can take this medication?

Consultations and prescriptions for this medication are only available through the hims platform for men aged 21 and up.

how do i take this medication?

Take this medicine only as directed by your doctor. Do not take more of it, do not take it more often, and do not take it for a longer time than your doctor ordered.

This medicine should come with a Medication Guide. It is very important that you read and understand this information. Be sure to ask your doctor about anything you do not understand.

The tablets may be taken with or without food.

how soon can I expect to see results?

Physicians typically recommend that the prescribed dosage of Sertraline be taken 2-6 hours before sex, but follow the instructions of your doctor. Not recommended for everyday use.

what are the potential side-effects?

The most common adverse reactions in pooled placebo-controlled clinical trials were nausea, diarrhea/loose stool, tremor, dyspepsia, decreased appetite, hyperhidrosis, ejaculation failure, and decreased libido.

Important safety information:

Drug interactions with Sertraline:

Please note that these possible interactions will be more common if you take Sertraline daily. We do NOT recommend daily use for PE at this time.

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

  • Bepridil
  • Bromopride
  • Cisapride
  • Clorgyline
  • Dronedarone
  • Eliglustat
  • Furazolidone
  • Iproniazid
  • Isocarboxazid
  • Linezolid
  • Mesoridazine
  • Methylene Blue
  • Metoclopramide
  • Moclobemide
  • Nialamide
  • Pargyline
  • Phenelzine
  • Pimozide
  • Piperaquine
  • Procarbazine
  • Rasagiline
  • Saquinavir
  • Selegiline
  • Sparfloxacin
  • Terfenadine
  • Thioridazine
  • Toloxatone
  • Tranylcypromine
  • Ziprasidone


Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

Using Sertraline with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines:

  • Alprazolam
  • Cimetidine
  • Fluphenazine
  • Ginkgo
  • Lamotrigine
  • Propranolol
  • Rifampin
  • Zolpidem

Important Medical Problems
The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Bipolar disorder (mood disorder with mania and depression), or risk of or
  • Bleeding problems
  • Diabetes
  • Glaucoma, angle-closure, or history of or
  • Hyponatremia (low sodium in the blood) or
  • Mania or hypomania, history of or
  • Purpura (purplish or brownish-red discoloration of the skin), history of or
  • Seizures, history of - Use with caution. May make these conditions worse.
  • Liver disease - Use with caution. The effects may be increased because of slower removal of the medicine from the body.

Special Precautions

Do not take sertraline with a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor (eg, isocarboxazid [Marplan®], phenelzine [Nardil®], selegiline[Eldepryl®], tranylcypromine [Parnate®]). Do not start taking sertraline during the 2 weeks after you stop a MAO inhibitor and wait 2 weeks after stopping sertraline before you start taking a MAO inhibitor. If you take them together or do not wait 2 weeks, you may develop confusion, agitation, restlessness, stomach or intestinal symptoms, a sudden high body temperature, an extremely high blood pressure, or severe convulsions.

Sertraline may cause a serious condition called Serotonin Syndrome if taken together with some medicines. Do not use sertraline with buspirone (Buspar®), fentanyl (Abstral®, Duragesic®), linezolid (Zyvox®), lithium (Eskalith®, Lithobid®), methylene blue injection, tryptophan, St. John's wort, or some pain or migraine medicines (eg, rizatriptan, sumatriptan, tramadol, Frova®, Imitrex®, Maxalt®, Relpax®, Ultram®, Zomig®). Check with your doctor first before taking any other medicines with sertraline.

For some children, teenagers, and young adults, this medicine can increase thoughts of suicide. Tell your doctor right away if you start to feel more depressed and have thoughts about hurting yourself. Report any unusual thoughts or behaviors that trouble you especially if they are new or get worse quickly. Make sure the doctor knows if you have trouble sleeping, get upset easily, have a big increase in energy, or start to act reckless. Also tell the doctor if you have sudden or strong feelings, such as feeling nervous, angry, restless, violent, or scared. Let the doctor know if you or anyone in your family has bipolar disorder (manic-depressive) or has tried to commit suicide.

Sertraline may increase your risk for bleeding problems. Make sure your doctor knows if you are also using other medicines that thin the blood, such as aspirin, NSAID pain or arthritis medicines (eg, diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, Advil®, Aleve®, Celebrex®, Voltaren®), or warfarin (Coumadin®, Jantoven®).

This medicine may cause hyponatremia (low sodium in the blood). This is more common in elderly patients, those who are taking diuretic medicines for high blood pressure, or those who have decreased amounts of fluid in the body due to severe diarrhea or vomiting. Check with your doctor right away if you have headache, trouble concentrating, memory problems, confusion, weakness, or unsteadiness.

This medicine may affect blood sugar levels. If you are diabetic and notice a change in the results of your blood or urine sugar tests, talk with your doctor.

The use of alcohol is not recommended in patients who are taking sertraline.

This medicine may cause some people to become drowsy, to have trouble thinking, or to have problems with movement. Make sure you know how you react to this medicine before you drive, use machines, or do anything else that could be dangerous if you are not alert or well-coordinated.

Before you have any medical tests, tell the medical doctor in charge that you or are taking this medicine. The results of some tests may be affected by this medicine.

what happens if i overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

To learn more about Sertraline we recommend accessing the Prescribers Digital Reference (PDR).

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